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medieval

The Medieval period in Britain stretched between the early Norman age to Tudor times. It saw a change from warrior kings to noble knights, chivalry and honour. It saw the strengthening of Christianity and the church which became all powerful and rich.

 

This was a literate time with wonderful manuscripts being produced by the monasteries. In AD 1086, 20 years after the Norman invasion, King William and his Barons drew up and signed the Doomsday Book at Old Sarum near Salisbury. This recorded and documented for the first time who owned what and where in Britain. In AD 1215 saw the signing of the Magna Carta at Runnymede near Windsor by King John and his Barons. This laid down the laws of the land.

 

Christian crusades were undertaken to the Holy Land. Great stone castles, priories, abbeys and cathedrals were constructed. The plague or "black death" reduced the population by a third between 1348-49. The Hundred Years War raged between England and France between the mid 14th and 15th centuries, followed by the War of the Roses from 1455-85. During the 11th century the artistic style was a combination taken from the Anglo-Saxon Viking and Norman periods. By the 12th century Romanesque art influenced by the church prevailed.

 

The 13th century saw Gothic art emerge which was more realistic, detailed and ornate. This style continued until the end of the medieval period late in the 15th century. AD 1485 saw the end of the medieval period and the start of Renaissance and Tudor England. Artefacts from the Medieval period are highly collectable and are varied from heraldic, horse pendants, ecclesiastical or religious items, weapons, pottery, buckles, seals, jewellery including rings, brooches, figurines, and many other various everyday items. A classic period with a wide range for the connoisseur and collector.

Catalogue Description

M-101

Medieval Bronze Dagger Pommel circa 15th Century. This is of a very unusual and rare form in the shape of gloved hand thought to be that of a falconer. Most likely would have been fitted as a dagger pommel to that of a falconer by trade. Falconry was one of the sports of kings. The item is well constructed with good detailed markings, and separation between the fingers and thumb. There is a slight depression to the bronze at the bottom of the front side, and a small lug can be seen on the inside of the hand. The item has a good dark green/brown patina and measures 60mm in length. Found in Norfolk England. Comes complete with an acrylic stand for display purposes. A very nice, rare, and interesting item. 

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M-101

£150.00

Medieval Bronze Dagger Pommel circa 15th Century. This is of a very unusual and rare form in the shape of gloved hand thought to be that of a falconer. Most likely would have been fitted as a dagger pommel to that of a falconer by trade. Falconry was one of the sports of kings. The item is well constructed with good detailed markings, and separation between the fingers and thumb. There is a slight depression to the bronze at the bottom of the front side, and a small lug can be seen on the inside of the hand. The item has a good dark green/brown patina and measures 60mm in length. Found in Norfolk England. Comes complete with an acrylic stand for display purposes. A very nice, rare, and interesting item. 


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M-102

Medieval Arrow Head circa 12th-14th Century. During the Medieval period arrows were used with long bows for sport, hunting, and of course warfare. The long bow was usually made from supple elm or yew wood, and would have measured about 5ft long. It was the most decisive weapon of the 14th century. To the trained archer it was fast and accurate. The introduction of plate armour in the 14th century meant that arrowheads needed to be narrower and heavier. This particular example is made of iron and measures 105mm long. It is of the barbed and socketed tang type, and is presented on a small acrylic display stand.

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M-102

£95.00

Medieval Arrow Head circa 12th-14th Century. During the Medieval period arrows were used with long bows for sport, hunting, and of course warfare. The long bow was usually made from supple elm or yew wood, and would have measured about 5ft long. It was the most decisive weapon of the 14th century. To the trained archer it was fast and accurate. The introduction of plate armour in the 14th century meant that arrowheads needed to be narrower and heavier. This particular example is made of iron and measures 105mm long. It is of the barbed and socketed tang type, and is presented on a small acrylic display stand.


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M-105

Medieval Buckle and Plate With Inscription circa 14th Century. Until the 13th century buckles were rare and cherished items. They became more readily available during the 14th century, and by the 15th century were being mass produced in moulds, and therefore by that time were worn by everybody including the lower classes. This example is made of bronze and was discovered in Gloucestershire England. It is inscribed with the religious letters "I (J) H. S" which stood for the Latin words "Jesu Humanus Sanctus" indicating a religious connection with a monk or priest. The bow appears to be that of two trumpet or animal heads being joined by a flat catch plate for the pin, which is still in tact and in free movement and not corroded. The plate itself is in fine condition and showing good detailed markings. The separate underside of the plate remains and has four rivet positions between which the leather would have been fastened. An interesting buckle. 

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M-105

£95.00

Medieval Buckle and Plate With Inscription circa 14th Century. Until the 13th century buckles were rare and cherished items. They became more readily available during the 14th century, and by the 15th century were being mass produced in moulds, and therefore by that time were worn by everybody including the lower classes. This example is made of bronze and was discovered in Gloucestershire England. It is inscribed with the religious letters "I (J) H. S" which stood for the Latin words "Jesu Humanus Sanctus" indicating a religious connection with a monk or priest. The bow appears to be that of two trumpet or animal heads being joined by a flat catch plate for the pin, which is still in tact and in free movement and not corroded. The plate itself is in fine condition and showing good detailed markings. The separate underside of the plate remains and has four rivet positions between which the leather would have been fastened. An interesting buckle. 


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M-107

Medieval Bronze Ring circa 15th Century. A good solid example of a bronze medieval ring. It has a thick band with inscribed line decoration to the shoulders and a protruding bezel with further inscribed decoration. The ring has been professionally restored to its original state. Good solid example of medieval jewellery. Found in the River Thames London.

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M-107

£75.00

Medieval Bronze Ring circa 15th Century. A good solid example of a bronze medieval ring. It has a thick band with inscribed line decoration to the shoulders and a protruding bezel with further inscribed decoration. The ring has been professionally restored to its original state. Good solid example of medieval jewellery. Found in the River Thames London.


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M-108

Medieval Amphora circa 15th Century. This large medieval terracotta amphora was discovered in Cyprus. It is complete and undamaged, and shows clear markings where once it would have been decorated in bright colours, which have long since faded. It is of Anatolian or Romano Turkish in design and style. 14 inches high x 7 inches wide.

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M-108

£250.00

Medieval Amphora circa 15th Century. This large medieval terracotta amphora was discovered in Cyprus. It is complete and undamaged, and shows clear markings where once it would have been decorated in bright colours, which have long since faded. It is of Anatolian or Romano Turkish in design and style. 14 inches high x 7 inches wide.


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M-112

Medieval Lead Money Weight circa 12th Century. Circular and inscribed with a cross shape, and slight indented holes in each quarter of the cross, with the reverse side being plain. This old lead weight was found near Warminster in Wiltshire England. 

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M-112

£20.00

Medieval Lead Money Weight circa 12th Century. Circular and inscribed with a cross shape, and slight indented holes in each quarter of the cross, with the reverse side being plain. This old lead weight was found near Warminster in Wiltshire England. 


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M-111

Medieval Bronze Horse Harness Boss circa 15th Century. This bronze item is semi circle in shape, and the edge is scalloped. Signs of gilding are visible to the surface, and three fixing lugs still remain on the reverse. It was discovered in Wiltshire England.

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M-111

£35.00

Medieval Bronze Horse Harness Boss circa 15th Century. This bronze item is semi circle in shape, and the edge is scalloped. Signs of gilding are visible to the surface, and three fixing lugs still remain on the reverse. It was discovered in Wiltshire England.


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M-116

Important Medieval lead ampulla 14th century AD
Here we have an item with Medieval Royal connections. This lead ampulla once contained "holy water" sold by monks to a Christian pilgrim visiting a saints shrine during the 14th century. Opposite the Christian scallop the letter "P" surmounted by a crown can clearly be seen surrounded by flowers. Research shows that this represents PHILIPPA of HAINAULT [1314 – 1369 AD] daughter of William 1 of Hainault in the Low Countries. Philippa married King Edward 111 in October 1327, and formally the following year in January 1328 at York Minster. She acted as regent on several occasions whilst the King was away in France. She was the mother of Edward, the Black Prince, and John of Gaunt 1st Duke of Lancaster. Philippa won much popularity with the English people for her kindness and compassion. Queens colledge Oxford was named in her honour. She was crowned Queen consort of England on 4th March 1330 and died of illness at Windsor Castle on 15th August 1369 age 55, and was buried at Westminster Abbey London. This item was discovered in Lincolnshire UK. Size: 4 x 4 cms. 

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M-116

£225.00

Important Medieval lead ampulla 14th century AD
Here we have an item with Medieval Royal connections. This lead ampulla once contained "holy water" sold by monks to a Christian pilgrim visiting a saints shrine during the 14th century. Opposite the Christian scallop the letter "P" surmounted by a crown can clearly be seen surrounded by flowers. Research shows that this represents PHILIPPA of HAINAULT [1314 – 1369 AD] daughter of William 1 of Hainault in the Low Countries. Philippa married King Edward 111 in October 1327, and formally the following year in January 1328 at York Minster. She acted as regent on several occasions whilst the King was away in France. She was the mother of Edward, the Black Prince, and John of Gaunt 1st Duke of Lancaster. Philippa won much popularity with the English people for her kindness and compassion. Queens colledge Oxford was named in her honour. She was crowned Queen consort of England on 4th March 1330 and died of illness at Windsor Castle on 15th August 1369 age 55, and was buried at Westminster Abbey London. This item was discovered in Lincolnshire UK. Size: 4 x 4 cms. 


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